Why do we remember stressful experiences better?

Stressful experiences are usually remembered more easily than neutral experiences. Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have analysed the reasons why this is the case. They put people in stressful situations during simulated job interviews ...

Oct 20

Categories: Stress Management

GO

Warm milk makes you sleepy - peptides could explain why

According to time-honored advice, drinking a glass of warm milk at bedtime will encourage a good night’s rest. Milk’s sleep-enhancing properties are commonly ascribed to tryptophan, but scientists have also discovered a mixture of milk peptides, ...

Oct 15

Categories: Sleep Disorders

GO

When It Comes to Communication Skills - Maybe We're Born with It?

From inside the womb and as soon as they enter the world, babies absorb information from their environment and the adults around them, quickly learning after birth how to start communicating through cries, sounds, giggles, and other kinds of baby ...

Sep 27

Categories: Communication Disorders Problems

GO

We've Neglected The Role Of 'Psychological Richness'

What is it that makes someone feel that theirs is a "good life"? Of all the ideas put forward over the past few millennia, two are most often extolled and researched today. The first is hedonistic wellbeing, often called simply "happiness", which is ...

Sep 22

Categories: Happiness

GO

What the Brain Shows: The Benefits of Virtual Reality in Creative ...

Virtual reality (VR) continues to expand its uses in medicine, specifically in treatments for psychological conditions like trauma, phobias and eating disorders. The technology is also emerging as a tool in creative arts therapies.

Sep 16

Categories: Art Therapy

GO

Brain Refreshing: Why the Dreaming Phase Matters

Researchers from the University of Tsukuba and Kyoto University find that capillary blood flow in the brain, which is important for delivering oxygen and nutrients and removing waste products, is increased in mice during the dream-active phase of ...

Sep 10

Categories: Sleep Disorders

GO

Beyond dopamine: New reward circuitry discovered

The key to overcoming addictions and psychiatric disorders lives deep inside the netherworld of our brains and the circuitry that causes us to feel good. Just like space, this region of the brain needs more exploration. The oldest and most known ...

Sep 6

Categories: Happiness

GO

When Bosses Are Respectful, Young People Are More Resilient At Work ...

From ball pits to free beers, fun job perks have received plenty of press attention over the last few years. For millennials, such benefits should surely be appealing - they are, after all, the generation these perks were ostensibly designed for. ...

Aug 31

Categories: Workplace Issues

GO

Having a Good Listener Improves Your Brain Health

Supportive social interactions in adulthood are important for your ability to stave off cognitive decline despite brain aging or neuropathological changes such as those present in Alzheimer's disease, a new study finds.

Aug 31

Categories: Mental Health in Asia

GO

Think leisure is a waste? That may not bode well for your mental ...

Feeling like leisure is wasteful and unproductive may lead to less happiness and higher levels of stress and depression, new research suggests.

Aug 27

Categories: Happiness

GO

New findings on how ketamine acts against depression

The discovery that the anaesthetic ketamine can help people with severe depression has raised hopes of finding new treatment options for the disease. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have now identified novel mechanistic insights of how the drug ...

Aug 20

Categories: Depression

GO

Remember more by taking breaks

We remember things longer if we take breaks during learning, referred to as the spacing effect. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology gained deeper insight into the neuronal basis for this phenomenon in mice. With longer intervals ...

Aug 10

Categories: Learning Difficulties

GO

New study suggests exercise can boost kids' vocabulary growth

A recent study by University of Delaware researchers suggests exercise can boost kids' vocabulary growth. The article, published in the Journal of Speech Language and Hearing Research, details one of the first studies on the effect of exercise on ...

Jul 29

Categories: Child Development

GO

'Feel Good' Brain Messenger Can Be Willfully Controlled, New Study ...

From the thrill of hearing an ice cream truck approaching to the spikes of pleasure while sipping a fine wine, the neurological messenger known as dopamine has been popularly described as the brain's "feel good" chemical related to reward and ...

Jul 26

Categories: Adjusting to Change / Life Transitions, Happiness

GO

Taking the brain out for a walk

If you're regularly out in the fresh air, you're doing something good for both your brain and your well-being. This is the conclusion reached by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and the Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf ...

Jul 22

Categories: Life Purpose / Meaning / Inner-Guidance

GO