Oxytocin has social, emotional and behavioral benefits in young kids with autism

Posted on October 28, 2015

The study, led by researchers at the University's Brain and Mind Centre, is thought to be the first evidence of a medical treatment for social impairments in children with autism. It is also the first clinical trial investigating the efficacy, tolerability and safety of intranasal-administered oxytocin in young children with autism.

Autism is a group of complex brain developmental disorders characterized by impairments in social interaction, communication, and stereotypical and repetitive behaviours. The diagnosed incidence is estimated to be one in 68 children and effective interventions remain limited.

Behavioural therapies can improve social, emotional and behavioural impairments but these are typically time consuming (40 hours per week), remain costly and show mixed outcomes. There is currently no medical treatment for these problems.

In this new study, 31 children aged three to eight years of age received a twice daily course of oxytocin in the form of a nasal spray.

"We used some of the most widely used assessments of social responsiveness for children with autism," said autism expert, Associate Professor Adam Guastella of the Brain and Mind Centre.

"We found that following oxytocin treatment, parents reported their child to be more socially responsive at home, and our own blind independent clinician ratings also supported improved social responsiveness in the therapy rooms of the Brain and Mind Centre," he said.

Overall, the nasal spray was well tolerated and the most common adverse events were thirst, urination and constipation.

This is the first time a medical treatment has shown this type of benefit for children with autism and findings reinforce outcomes from a longer sustained program of research by this team.


Category(s):Autism spectrum disorders

Source material from University of Sydney


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