Lack of face-to-face contact almost doubles depression risk for older adults

Posted on October 7, 2015

Older adults who have little face-to-face contact with family and friends are at almost twice the risk of developing depression, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

"Research has long supported the idea that strong social bonds strengthen people's mental health. But this is the first look at the role that the type of communication with loved ones and friends plays in safeguarding people from depression," notes Dr. Alan Teo.

Recent research found that that older adults who had very little in-person contact with their family and friends were at almost double the risk for depression 2 years later.

Findings also showed that that frequency of telephone, written or email contact had no effect on participants' risk for depression.

These findings magnify the importance of having face-to-face social interactions as a preventive strategy for depression.


Category(s):Adult psychological development, Depression

Source material from Medical News Today


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