The Use of Apps for Mental Health Has Outpaced the Scientific Evidence

Posted on October 2, 2015

Photo: flickr

When considering the use of apps as therapy, one has to ask the most important question: Does it work?

Although there are some promising studies showing positive effects of some apps, there have been few randomized clinical trials with adequate people and diversity to say anything definitive. “Further evidence about efficacy is needed,” wrote the authors of one recent review of the scientific literature.

High attrition rate is a significant problem with apps: People begin using them but often tire of the required dedication quickly. More importantly, using an app doesn’t allow individuals to deeply connect to other humans – be they therapist or friend.

The proliferation of apps and their use has outpaced the scientific evidence. Ultimately, people would be well served to go beyond Internet apps to help alleviate the depressive and anxious episodes they experience.

Click on the link below to read the full article.

Category(s):Mental Health in Asia

Source material from The New York Times

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