Yes, It's Possible To Be Both An Introvert And An Extravert

Posted on November 25, 2014

We love to proudly label ourselves as introverts or extraverts. If the Internet has anything to say about it, introverts particularly enjoy categorizing themselves as such and connecting with fellow introverts (virtually, not in person of course) over their mutual distaste for parties and small talk.

But in reality, few of us fit neatly into either of these personality types. And for those of us who are truly in the middle of the introversion/extraversion spectrum, there's a name, too. Psychologists refer to such people as ambiverts, meaning that we express qualities and behaviors of both introverts and extraverts, depending on the situation.

On scales of personality, you can become an ambivert through two routes: You can answer in the middle of the scale on all the items - for instance, you feel neutral about social situations and crowds, and you're also lukewarm in your enjoyment of staying in and being alone. Or, you can be an ambivert because you oscillate between the two extremes - sometimes you're the life of the party, and other times you want nothing but solitude.

To some extent, the classification is arbitrary. Judging degrees of extraversion is like judging how tall or short a person is. Any judgment of a person's height depends on how we define short and tall, just as judging one's level of extraversion depends on how we define introvert, extravert and ambivert.

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Source material from Huffington Post


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