Let the Body Rest, for the Sake of the Brain

Posted on November 8, 2014

Photo: flickr

We take it for granted, but most people have to wake up for work (or school or other morning obligations) long before they want to. Sleeping in is treated as a cherished luxury - it's somehow become normal that people wake up still exhausted, and anything but is a notable exception. But rising before the body wants to affects not only morale and energy, but brain function as well.

"The practice of going to sleep and waking up at 'unnatural' times could be the most prevalent high-risk behavior in modern society," writes Till Roenneberg, a professor of chronobiology at the Institute of Medical Psychology at Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munch.

Of course, different people require different amounts of sleep and although there’s no universal rule for how long we should all be sleeping, it's becoming increasingly clear that working late and waking early can cause serious problems. It’s not just repeated sleep deprivation that does people in, either. Just one restless night can seriously affect us in the morning.

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Category(s):Sleep Disorders, Stress Management

Source material from The Alantic


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