Pioneering online treatment for people with Bipolar Disorder

Posted on August 14, 2014

Photo: flickr

The first effective web-based treatment for Bipolar Disorder based on the latest research evidence has been developed by psychologists.

People with Bipolar Disorder have problems getting access to psychological therapy and this online intervention, published in the Journal of Affective Disorders, may offer a round the clock solution at a reduced cost to the NHS.

It was developed as part of the 'Living with Bipolar' project led by Dr Nicholas Todd under the supervision of Professor Fiona Lobban and Professor Steven Jones at the Spectrum Centre for Mental Health Research, Lancaster University.

92% of the participants in the trial of the online intervention found the content positive - and one said it had changed her life.

"I have encountered insights in the modules that have significantly helped me to survive the blackest moments. I cannot measure the value of this, as it has contributed to their difference between life and death. My husband and I are sincerely grateful for the immeasurable impact this has had on our family."

Therapeutic gains for the participants included improved stability, accessing additional help from friends and family, less reliance on services and more likely to turn to self-management.

To read the full article, please click on the link below.

Category(s):Bipolar, Mood Swings / Bipolar

Source material from Medical News Today

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