Teaching the Brain to Calm Itself

Posted on May 15, 2013

Estimates of combat-related Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in U.S. veterans since the Vietnam War ranges from approximately 2& to 17%. Additional studies of combat veterans of more recent wars places the range of Iraq War returnees who suffer from PTSD between 4% and 17%. Currently, there is no one form of treatment that has been found effective in combating this disorder, but can the brain somehow be encouraged to calm itself down?

PTSD is classified as an anxiety disorder brought on as the result of witnessing a life-threatening event. The individual repeatedly re-experiences distressing memories of the event and this constant repetition eventually alters the composition of the neural networks which process traumatic memories.

Click on the link below to read the full article


Category(s):Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) / Trauma / Complex PTSD, Relaxation techniques

Source material from Brain Blogger


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