Facebook or Twitter: What does your choice of social networking site ...

Social networking sites have changed our lives. There were 500 million active Facebook users in 2011 and approximately 200 million Twitter accounts. As users will know, the sites have important differences. Facebook places more of an emphasis on who ...

Feb 3

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What 10 Days of Silent Meditation Taught Me

Recently I had the privilege of attending a ten day silent meditation retreat at the Vipassana Meditation Center in Massachusetts. Although I have meditated on occasion, I had never done anything like this before so I wasn't sure what to expect. The ...

Feb 3

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Facebook is not such a good thing for those with low self-esteem

In theory, the social networking website Facebook could be great for people with low self-esteem. Sharing is important for improving friendships. But in practice, people with low self-esteem seem to behave counterproductively, bombarding their ...

Feb 2

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Here Is What Real Commitment to Your Marriage Means

"When people say, 'I'm committed to my relationship,' they can mean two things," said study co-author Benjamin Karney, a professor of psychology and co-director of the Relationship Institute at UCLA. "One thing they can mean is, 'I really like this ...

Feb 2

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What a Yawn Says about Your Relationship

Yawning is more contagious among people who are emotionally close. A recent study conducted by Ivan Norscia and Elisabetta Palagi and published in the journal PLoSONE has found such evidence in the unlikeliest of places: yawns. More specifically, ...

Feb 2

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The psychology of losing weight explained

Like many Singaporeans, Bryan Ho loves his bak kwa (barbecued meat). However, over the recent Chinese New Year weekend, the 31-year-old IT consultant did his best to resist the treat while his family and friends scoffed them down. "(Bak kwa) is ...

Feb 1

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Behind the Corporate Mask is a Traumatized Leader

In "Transforming Toxic Leaders" (Stanford University Press, 2009) I testify that behind their corporate masks business leaders suffer hurt, pain and trauma. A traumatized boss is frequently the result of a gut wrenching rightsizing or downsizing. ...

Feb 1

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Lifelong Payoff for Attentive Kindergarten Kids

Attentiveness in kindergarten accurately predicts the development of "work-oriented" skills in school children, according to a new study published by Dr. Linda Pagani, a professor and researcher at the University of Montreal and CHU Sainte-Justine. ...

Feb 1

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Psychology ignored and depression neglected in the media's coverage ...

Research into some mental disorders receives disproportionate media coverage at the expense of other disorders. That's according to the first systematic study of the way the UK mass media covers mental illness. And in a wake-up call to psychology ...

Jan 31

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Fathers, Daughters and the "Touch Taboo"

How fathers can maintain strong bonds with their physically maturing daughter . Some fathers are not quite sure how to react to their quickly developing daughters, and may withdraw as a result. The danger is that the daughter may internalize this ...

Jan 31

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Divorce hurts health more at earlier ages

Divorce at a younger age hurts people’s health more than divorce later in life, according to a new study by a Michigan State University sociologist. Hui Liu said the findings, which appear in the research journal Social Science & Medicine, ...

Jan 31

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The Problem With Living A Creative Life

Being creative is hard. Thinking up ways to connect disparate elements into a whole that not only hasn't been seen before but also delights us with surprise, meaning, or beauty requires a great deal of energy—"executive function," as psychologists ...

Jan 30

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Children with autism show signs in first year: Study

Children who develop autism already show signs of different brain responses in their first year of life, scientists said yesterday in a study that may in the future help doctors diagnose the disorder earlier. British researchers studied 104 ...

Jan 30

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Life of crime is in the genes, study claims

Lifelong criminals could be genetically programmed to break the law, a study claims. The idea crime could be in part genetic is extremely controversial because most criminologists argue the root causes of crime are environmental factors such as ...

Jan 30

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People Lie More When Texting

Sending a text message leads people to lie more often than in other forms of communication, according to new research by David Xu, assistant professor in the W. Frank Barton School of Business at Wichita State University. The study involved 170 ...

Jan 28

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