People Can Be Tricked into Reversing Their Opinions on Morality

People can be tricked into reversing their opinions on moral issues, even to the point of constructing good arguments to support the opposite of their original positions. The surveys contained a ‘magic trick’. Each contained two sets of ...

Sep 22

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Psychology can explain and improve bad classroom behaviour

Psychology and Antisocial Behaviour in School looks at the evidence from psychology for understanding troublesome behaviour in schools, dealing with behaviour in general, specific types of behaviour such as bullying, developmental disorders such as ...

Sep 22

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How to Win Over Someone Who Doesn't Like You

Does your co-worker scowl every time you walk by? Is that guy in your networking group consistently aloof? Sometimes, for no clear reason, someone may decide they dislike you – and if you want a more comfortable work environment, it’s up to you ...

Sep 21

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Fear can be erased from the brain

When a person learns something, a lasting long-term memory is created with the aid of a process of consolidation, which is based on the formation of proteins. When we remember something, the memory becomes unstable for a while and is then ...

Sep 21

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Can watching the news can make you sick? New research says yes

Researchers at the University of California at Irvine followed the viewing habits of American subjects before and after the events of 9/11, and found that those who watched more than four hours a day of 9/11 and Iraq War-related coverage were more ...

Sep 21

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The More People Rely On Their Intuitions, the More Cooperative They ...

It's an age old question: Why do we do good? What makes people sometimes willing to put "We" ahead of "Me?" Perhaps our first impulse is to be selfish, and cooperation is all about reining in greed. Or maybe cooperation happens spontaneously, and ...

Sep 20

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Why do we pay more than we should at auctions?

The reason we end up overspending is a result of one unavoidably irrational part of the bidding process – and that’s ourselves. The allure and tension of an auction are familiar to most of us – let’s face it, we all like the idea of ...

Sep 20

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The impact of Divorce on Children

The immediate aftermath of parental divorce is often a period of emotional distress for both parents and children. Resilience is a key factor in a child’s ability to adapt to the separation of their parents and research has placed attention on ...

Sep 20

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How You Handle Rejection Says a Lot About Your Mental State

We don’t like it, but it’s a fact of life: REJECTION! It could be as simple as my rejection letter below or as complicated as one person rejecting another in a relationship. Whatever the case, rejection stinks. When you have low self esteem, ...

Sep 19

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Exercise helps people cope better with life's daily stress and ...

“While it is well-known that exercise improves mood, among other benefits, not as much is known about whether these positive effects endure when we’re faced with everyday stressors once we leave the gym,” explains Dr. J. Carson Smith, the ...

Sep 19

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Prejudice Can Cause Depression at the Societal, Interpersonal, and ...

Although depression and prejudice traditionally fall into different areas of study and treatment, a new article suggests that many cases of depression may be caused by prejudice from the self or from another person. In an article published in the ...

Sep 19

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How the presence of an uninformative photo makes a statement more ...

When we're making a snap judgement about a fact, the mere presence of an accompanying photograph makes us more likely to think it's true, even when the photo doesn't provide any evidence one way or the other. In the words of Eryn Newman and her ...

Sep 18

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Mindless tasks boost creative potential

“Do you have a numbingly dull job, one so monotonous that you frequently find your mind wandering?” asks Pacific Standard magazine. “Well, congratulations: Without realizing it, you have boosted your creative potential. Mindless tasks that ...

Sep 18

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Why We're Happy Being Sad: Pop Music's Emotional Evolution

Schellenberg works at the University of Toronto, where he studies the psychology of music. The idea behind his experiment couldn't have been more straightforward: He simply wanted to play music for people and get them to rate how happy or sad that ...

Sep 17

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