The Obese Brain May Thwart Weight Loss

New research by Terry Davidson, director of American University’s Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, indicates that diets that lead to obesity—diets high in saturated fat and refined sugar—may cause changes to the brains of obese people that ...

Oct 2

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How and Why Writing Heals Wounds of Child Abuse

More than simply a catharsis or venting, translating events into language can affect brain and immune functions. The subjects he tested had an increase in germ-fighting lymphocytes in their blood and lower stress levels. Writing was found to reduce ...

Oct 2

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Why Being a Leader Is Less Stressful than Following

Contrary to the common wisdom that people in positions of power are more stressed than the rest of us, a new study finds that those in higher-ranking roles wield more control and, thus, suffer less stress and anxiety. While the image of the ...

Oct 1

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IU research study finds social bullying prevalent in children’s ...

A new research study led by an Indiana University professor has found that social bullying is just as prevalent in children's television as depictions of physical aggression. Nicole Martins The study, "Mean on the Screen: Social Aggression in ...

Oct 1

Categories: Child and/or Adolescent Issues

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How We Know That Humans Are Getting Smarter

Some years ago, acting as an archaeologist, I amassed a large body of data showing that IQ tests had gotten easier. Over the twentieth century, the average person was getting many more items correct on tests like Raven's and Similarities. The ...

Oct 1

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Money Degrades Our Ability to Empathize

Given the tone-deaf comments a wealthy political figure recently made while addressing some equally affluent donors, you’d almost think money makes a person less able to relate to the feelings of others. And, according to newly published ...

Sep 29

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UCSB Evolutionary Psychologists Study the Purpose of Punishment and ...

For two decades, evolutionary scientists have been locked in a debate over the evolved functions of three distinctive human behaviors: the great readiness we show for cooperating with new people, the strong interest we have in tracking others' ...

Sep 29

Categories: Adult psychological development

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A Longer Life Is Lived With Company

YOU die alone, philosophers say. But you could die sooner if you live your life in loneliness. Close connections to friends and family may ward off poor health and premature death, recent research suggests. Loneliness is a risk factor for ...

Sep 29

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“I’m Bored!” – Research on Attention Sheds Light on the ...

You’re waiting in the reception area of your doctor’s office. The magazines are uninteresting. The pictures on the wall are dull. The second hand on the wall clock moves so excruciatingly slowly that you’re sure it must be broken. You feel ...

Sep 28

Categories: Adult ADHD

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Neglected Babies Develop Less Myelin

solating mouse pups from their mothers early in development can reduce the insulation surrounding neurons of the brain, which leads to problems with memory and socialization, a study in Science reported last week (September 14). The study provides a ...

Sep 28

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Researchers investigate aggression among kindergartners

Not all aggressive children are aggressive for the same reasons, according to Penn State researchers, who found that some kindergartners who are aggressive show low verbal abilities while others are more easily physiologically aroused. The findings ...

Sep 28

Categories: Aggression & Violence, Antisocial personality, Child and/or ...

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Eyes: a Window to Diagnosis

Observing patients’ eye movements may hold clues about neurological functioning. In a study published last month (August 25) in the Journal of Neurology, scientists show that subtle differences in eye movement patterns can be utilized to identify ...

Sep 27

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Caltech study shows that the distance at which facial photos are ...

As the saying goes, "A picture is worth a thousand words." For people in certain professions—acting, modeling, and even politics—this phrase rings particularly true. Previous studies have examined how our social judgments of pictures of people ...

Sep 27

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Laugh and the workplace laughs with you

How far can a laugh carry? According to Christopher Robert and James Wilbanks, it can reverberate through time, with far-reaching consequences. Their theoretical paper, synthesising research from neuroscience, behavioural psychology and the ...

Sep 27

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Removing the Optimism Bias

Humans tend to embrace good news, while discounting bad news. We overestimate our odds of winning the lottery or living long lives, while underplaying our risk of cancer, divorce, or unemployment. Now, researchers from University College London ...

Sep 26

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