The experience of awe can slow down perceived time in people’s lives

In a study published in Psychological Science, researchers Melanie Rudd, Kathleen D. Vohs, and Jennifer Aaker found that people who experience awe, by watching a 60-second commercial featuring stunning scenes from nature, feel time passing more ...

Nov 9

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Feel-good hormone helps to jog the memory

The feel-good hormone dopamine improves long-term memory. This is the finding of a team lead by Emrah Düzel, neuroscientist at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and the University of Magdeburg. The researchers investigated ...

Nov 9

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There’s no single silver bullet to treat depression (not even ...

A new study has found lit­tle evi­dence that aer­o­bic exer­cise helps treat depres­sion, con­trary to pop­u­lar belief…Danish researchers Krogh and col­leagues ran­domly 115 assigned depressed peo­ple to one of two exer­cise ...

Nov 9

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Gargling Sugar Water Boosts Self-Control, Study Finds

To boost self-control, gargle sugar water. According to a study co-authored by University of Georgia professor of psychology Leonard Martin published Oct. 22 in Psychological Science, a mouth rinse with glucose improves self-control.

Nov 8

Categories: Control Issues

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Why are couples so mean to single people?

No-one is supposed to be single. In the course of my life, I have loved and lost and sometimes won, and always strangers have been kind. But I have, it appears, been set on a life of single blessedness. And I haven't minded. Or rather, I ...

Nov 8

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Inside the Minds of the Perfectionists

Perfectionism isn't a psychological condition—there isn't even an official definition. Some people see it as a point of pride to push themselves to achieve and pay close attention to detail. But experts say that perfectionism can become toxic when ...

Nov 7

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TAU research finds that embracing two cultures helps you climb the ...

Unlike patterns of cultural identification in which individuals endorse only one of the two cultures, bicultural identification requires individuals to take into account and combine the perspectives of both old and new cultures," explains Dr. ...

Nov 7

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How the Stress of Disaster Brings People Together

Ever feel that stress makes you more cranky, hot-headed or irritable? For men in particular, we think of stress as generating testosterone-fueled aggression – thus instances of road rage, or the need to “blow off steam” after work with a trip ...

Nov 7

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The psychology of Everything in 48 mins

The Psychology of Everything: What Compassion, Racism, and Sex tell us about Human Nature 

Nov 6

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The Knowing Nose: Chemosignals Communicate Human Emotions

Many animal species transmit information via chemical signals, but the extent to which these chemosignals play a role in human communication is unclear. In a new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for ...

Nov 6

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Treating Phobias With Hypnosis: The Rewind Technique

Phobias are fairly common. The National Institute of Mental Health estimates that approximately 8-18% of the American population suffers from a phobia. They are the most common form of an anxiety disorder. Among women of all ages, phobias are the ...

Nov 6

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Ruminative thoughts deepen the long-term impact of workplace violence

Experiencing workplace violence can have negative impacts far beyond the event itself. How do our own thoughts and cognitions influence this? And is there anything we can do about it? Karen Niven and colleagues from the universities of Manchester ...

Nov 5

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Reactions to everyday stressors predict future health

Contrary to popular perception, stressors don't cause health problems -- it's people's reactions to the stressors that determine whether they will suffer health consequences, according to researchers at Penn State.

Nov 5

Categories: Stress Management

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ADHD Drugs Do Not Raise Heart Risk In Children

Children who take Adderall, Ritalin, and other central nervous system stimulants, do not have a higher chance of developing serious heart conditions. This finding, confirming research from 2011, came from a study at the University of Florida and ...

Nov 5

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