Study suggests we are basically honest – except when we are at work

A new study has revealed we are more honest than you might think. The research by the University of Oxford and the University of Bonn suggests that it pains us to tell lies, particularly when we are in our own homes. It appears that being honest is ...

Dec 17

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An evolutionary psychology perspective: why virtually all spree ...

After the recent Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre of innocents, a friend of mine posted this question to his Facebook page: "Once again, we miss the obvious... It is boys and men who shoot, not girls and women! Mental illness aside... what is ...

Dec 17

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Impaired executive function may exacerbate impulsiveness and risk of ...

Executive function (EF), frequently associated with the frontal lobes, guides complex behavior such as planning, decision-making, and response control. EF impairment due to alcohol dependence (AD) has been linked to alcohol's toxic effects on the ...

Dec 17

Categories: Addictions

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Schizophrenia linked to social inequality

Higher rates of schizophrenia in urban areas can be attributed to increased deprivation, increased population density and an increase in inequality within a neighbourhood, new research reveals. The research, led by the University of Cambridge in ...

Dec 15

Categories: Schizophrenia

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Asperger’s gone, dyslexia stays in first change to psychiatric ...

The now familiar term “Asperger’s disorder” is being dropped. And abnormally bad and frequent temper tantrums will be given a scientific-sounding diagnosis called DMDD. But “dyslexia” and other learning disorders remain. The revisions ...

Dec 15

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Countering brain chemical could prevent suicides

Researchers have found the first proof that a chemical in the brain called glutamate is linked to suicidal behavior, offering new hope for efforts to prevent people from taking their own lives. Writing in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, ...

Dec 15

Categories: Suicide Prevention

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Understanding How Children Develop Empathy

The mother was trying to hold the baby still, and I was pulling gently on the ear, angling for a better look at the infant’s eardrum. The wriggling baby didn’t like any of it, and her whimpering quickly turned to full-fledged wails. Suddenly ...

Dec 14

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Psychosocial Distress Associated With Increased Stroke Risk

People over age 65 with high psychosocial distress face increased risk of stroke External link, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Stroke. Psychosocial distress is a broad concept that includes depression, stress, ...

Dec 14

Categories: Depression

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How do stay-at-home dads seek greater social acceptance?

In order to avoid the stigma and loss of status posed by their lifestyle choice, stay-at-home fathers are mobilizing to build greater legitimacy for their marginalized gender identity, according to a new study in the Journal of Consumer ...

Dec 14

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Too Big or Just Right? Optimal Circle of Friends Depends on ...

Some people like to have a few close friends, while others prefer a wider social circle that is perhaps less deep. These preferences reflect people’s personalities and individual circumstances — but is one approach to social networks ...

Dec 13

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New antidepressant acts very rapidly and is long lasting

A first-of-its-kind antidepressant drug discovered by a Northwestern University professor and now tested on adults who have failed other antidepressant therapies has been shown to alleviate symptoms within hours, have good safety and produce ...

Dec 13

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Stress-Resilience/Susceptibility Traced to Neurons in Reward Circuit

A specific pattern of neuronal firing in a brain reward circuit instantly rendered mice vulnerable to depression-like behavior induced by acute severe stress, a study supported by the National Institutes of Health has found. When researchers used a ...

Dec 13

Categories: Stress Management

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Eating or Spending Too Much? Blame It on Facebook

Participating in online social networks can have a detrimental effect on consumer well-being by lowering self-control among certain users, according to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research. “Using online social networks can have a ...

Dec 12

Categories: Control Issues

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Putting a price on emotions

Would you pay more cash to experience intense happiness or to avoid intense embarrassment? Your answer may depend on the culture you live in. A team led by Hi Lau at the University of Hong Kong used this "willingness to pay" approach to find out ...

Dec 12

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Rethinking the Classic ‘Obedience’ Studies

Stanley Milgram’s 1961 obedience experiments and the 1971 Stanford Prison Experiment are legendary. But new research adds new wrinkles to our understanding of allegiance and evil. They are among the most famous of all psychological studies, and ...

Dec 12

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