Arguments in the Home Linked With Babies' Brain Functioning

Being exposed to arguments between parents is associated with the way babies' brains process emotional tone of voice, according to a new study to be published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The ...

Mar 26

Categories: Child Development, Parenting

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4 Steps to Break Down Failure

There is an epidemic of feelings of failure in our country. And failure is so definitive. When you think you failed, there is not much wiggle room to be anything other than “a failure.” A horrible way to see yourself! This becomes a belief ...

Mar 26

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Using Creative Design to influence human behavior

A thoughtfully designed building, a well-engineered car or a beautifully decorated home can all stimulate the pleasure centers in our brains. We're also drawn to certain colors and shapes, though for a long time we weren't sure why. That is ...

Mar 25

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Alterations in brain activity in children at risk of schizophrenia ...

Research from the University of North Carolina has shown that children at risk of developing schizophrenia have brains that function differently than those not at risk. Brain scans of children who have parents or siblings with the illness reveal a ...

Mar 25

Categories: Child Development, Schizophrenia

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Mindfulness Helps Us Understand Our True Personalities, Study Says

It's easy to have blind spots when examining our own selves and personalities. After all, it's incredibly difficult to judge ourselves in an objective manner. But a new study suggests the best way to really get to know ourselves -- without help from ...

Mar 25

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TED: To this Day Project


A spoken word poem on the trials of growing up and bullying.

Mar 23

Categories: Bullying, Child and/or Adolescent Issues, Child Development

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Serotonin Receptors Offer Clues to New Antidepressants

Researchers have deciphered the molecular structures of two of the brain's crucial lock-and-key mechanisms. The two molecules are receptors for the natural neurotransmitter serotonin — which regulates activities such as sleep, appetite and mood ...

Mar 23

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Parent induces guilt, child shows distress

The use of guilt-inducing parenting in daily parent-child interaction causes children distress still evident on the next day, emerges from the study Parents, teachers, and children’s learning (LIGHT) carried out by Kaisa Aunola, Asko Tolvanenen, ...

Mar 23

Categories: Child Development

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Laughter is the Best Medicine, Really

Hunter Doherty Adams, better known as Patch Adams, is both a physician and a clown who incorporates humor and joy as a form of alternative medicine for patients. While at face value these methods may seem to work simply as a means of distracting ...

Mar 22

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Primary Care Physicians Missing Early Signs of Serious Mental Illness

Primary care providers could help people with warning signs of psychosis get critical early treatment and potentially reduce the current burden on emergency departments and inpatient units, finds a study in the journal Social Psychiatry and ...

Mar 22

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Thinking of Science Strengthens Moral Fiber

Want to be a better person? Spend more time thinking about science. That’s the implication of newly published research, which finds people who study science—or even are momentarily exposed to the idea of scientific research—are more likely ...

Mar 22

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Humanoid robot helps train children with autism

“Aiden, look!” piped NAO, a two-foot tall humanoid robot, as it pointed to a flat-panel display on a far wall. As the cartoon dog Scooby Doo flashed on the screen, Aiden, a young boy with an unruly thatch of straw-colored hair, looked in the ...

Mar 21

Categories: Autism spectrum disorders

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The scourge of meeting late-comers

Tardiness at meetings is one of the biggest unexplored issues in work-place behaviour, according to a team of researchers in the USA. Steven Rogelberg and his colleagues attempted to estimate the base rate of meeting lateness via a survey of 195 ...

Mar 21

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Brain Mapping Reveals Neurological Basis of Decision-Making in Rats

Scientists at UC San Francisco have discovered how memory recall is linked to decision-making in rats, showing that measurable activity in one part of the brain occurs when rats in a maze are playing out memories that help them decide which way to ...

Mar 21

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Moving Backward Alters Our Perception of Time

When college students were asked to look one month either into the past or the future, they perceived the future as closer ("a really short time from now"), while feeling more "psychologically distant" from the past. Commuters at a Boston train ...

Mar 20

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