Gang Membership Tied To Mental Health Problems

Young men who are members of street gangs are more likely to have psychiatric illnesses and access mental health services, according to new research from the UK published online in the July 12th issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry. Lead ...

Jul 17

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Music decreases perceived pain for kids in pediatric ER: UAlberta ...

Newly published findings by medical researchers at the University of Alberta provide more evidence that music decreases children’s perceived sense of pain. Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry researcher Lisa Hartling led the research team that ...

Jul 16

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People Are Happier When They Do The Right Thing

What has happened to people's happiness all around the world as they've faced the economic crisis? How have they coped with job losses, less money coming in, the sense of despair and lack of control over a nightmare that seems to have no ...

Jul 16

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Missing Brain Enzymes in Mice leads to increased levels of worry

A little bit of learned fear is a good thing, keeping us from making risky, stupid decisions or falling over and over again into the same trap. But new research from neuroscientists and molecular biologists at USC shows that a missing brain protein ...

Jul 16

Categories: Anxiety

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Early spatial reasoning predicts later creativity and innovation, ...

Exceptional spatial ability at age 13 predicts creative and scholarly achievements more than 30 years later, according to results from a Vanderbilt University longitudinal study, published today in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association ...

Jul 15

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Raising adopted children, how parents cooperate matters more than gay ...

A new study by psychology researchers suggests that whether parents are gay, lesbian or straight, how well they work together as a couple and support each other in parenting is linked to fewer behavior problems among their adopted children and is ...

Jul 15

Categories: LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, & Transgender) Issues, Parenting

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Why do we enjoy listening to sad music?

Sad music might actually evoke positive emotions reveals a new study by Japanese researchers published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Psychology. The findings help to explain why people enjoy listening to sad music, say Ai Kawakami and ...

Jul 13

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Funny Video on Neurally informed Domestic "Negotiations"

Donna and Leslie are roommates who trigger each other. Now they have neuroscience terms to help them communicate and resolve their issues.

Jul 13

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Prisoners doing yoga may see psychological benefits

Yoga can improve mood and mental wellbeing among prisoners, an Oxford University study suggests, and may also have an effect on impulsive behaviour. The researchers found that prisoners after a 10-week yoga course reported improved mood, reduced ...

Jul 13

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How the brain creates the 'buzz' that helps ideas spread

How do ideas spread? What messages will go viral on social media, and can this be predicted? UCLA psychologists have taken a significant step toward answering these questions, identifying for the first time the brain regions associated with the ...

Jul 12

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Math Anxiety – Dealing with Fear of Failure

Not everybody loves math. In fact, some people report tension, apprehension, and fear when faced with the need to perform mathematical tasks as a part of everyday life. Not surprisingly, these highly math anxious individuals (HMAs) perform more ...

Jul 12

Categories: Anxiety

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Exposure to prenatal maternal antibodies affects behavior, ...

Researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute have found that prenatal exposure to specific combinations of antibodies found only in mothers of children with autism leads to changes in the brain that adversely affect behavior and development. The ...

Jul 12

Categories: Child Development

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Jealousy can drive us to view ourselves more like our rivals

If you see your partner flirt with someone else, you may feel hurt, angry, and jealous. The last thing you might expect is to start thinking of yourself more like your rival. New research suggests just that: that jealousy can prompt people to change ...

Jul 11

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Does sitting at a big desk make you cheat?

There could be an upside to being confined to that tiny cubicle at work: It may make you less likely to cheat. A new study to be published in a forthcoming issue of the journal Psychological Science finds that sitting at a large workspace or in a ...

Jul 11

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Sleepless nights can turn lovers into fighters

Relationship problems can keep us awake at night. But new research from UC Berkeley suggests that sleepless nights also can worsen lovers’ fights. UC Berkeley psychologists Amie Gordon and Serena Chen have found that people are much more likely ...

Jul 11

Categories: Relationships & Marriage, Sleep Disorders

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