Reading Facial Emotions

For half a century, one theory about the way we experience and express emotion has helped shape how we practice psychology, do police work, and even fight terrorism. But what if that theory is wrong? Forty-six years ago a young San ...

Jul 1

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The hack to save your marriage: Eli Finkel

According to Eli Finkel, we’ve changed how we value our personal ...

Jul 1

Categories: Marital Counseling, Relationships & Marriage

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Teenage Physical fitness reduces the risk of suicidal behavior later ...

Being in good physical shape at 18 years of age can be linked with a reduced risk of attempted suicide later in life. So says a study of over one million Swedish men conducted by researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, ...

Jun 29

Categories: Health / Illness / Medical Issues, Suicide Prevention

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Low Self-Control Promotes Selfless Behavior in Close Relationships

When faced with the choice of sacrificing time and energy for a loved one or taking the self-centered route, people’s first impulse is to think of others, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association ...

Jun 29

Categories: Control Issues, Relationships & Marriage

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Can mental training in compassion lead to altruistic behavior and ...

The first time I ever tried a loving-kindness med­i­ta­tion, I was over­come by a feel­ing of com­plete… futil­ity. Men­tally extend­ing com­pas­sion to oth­ers and wish­ing them free from suf­fer­ing seemed nice enough, but I had a ...

Jun 29

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The evolution of the psychoanalyst's office

New York psychoanalyst Mark Gerald is also a photographer, and for more than ten years he has photographed other psychoanalysts' offices, as part of a project called "In the Shadow of Freud's Couch." The images have been exhibited in New York and ...

Jun 28

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Ritalin Shows Promise in Treating Addiction

A single dose of a commonly-prescribed attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) drug helps improve brain function in cocaine addiction, according to an imaging study conducted by researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. ...

Jun 28

Categories: Addictions, Drug Addiction

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How pure irrelevance turns things invisible

There's such a blizzard of sensory information out there, the brain would be overwhelmed if it weren't for a spotlight process of selective attention that allows us to focus. This means that once we're tuned into certain aspects of the environment, ...

Jun 28

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How Men and Women Cooperate

Cooperation is essential in any successful romantic relationship, but how men and women experience cooperation emotionally may be quite different, according to new research conducted at the University of Arizona. Ashley Randall, a post-doctoral ...

Jun 27

Categories: Relationships & Marriage

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Research has discovered that autism in children affects not only ...

A group of investigators from San Diego State University’s Brain Development Imaging Laboratory are shedding a new light on the effects of autism on the brain. The team has identified that connectivity between the thalamus, a deep brain structure ...

Jun 27

Categories: Autism spectrum disorders

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Happier Spending

SQUARE WALLET, an innovative new app, is changing the way we spend our money. Here’s how it works: you link your credit or debit card to the app, shop, take your items to a cashier at a participating retailer and, as the company’s Web site says, ...

Jun 26

Categories: Happiness

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Feeling stressed?

The next time someone snubs you at a party and you think hiding is the solution to escape your feelings of rejection, think again. Scientists have shown that reaching out to other people during a stressful event is an effective way to improve your ...

Jun 26

Categories: Stress Management

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What’s the most ‘natural’ way to learn? It might surprise you

Here is a counterintuitive piece on what we consider the “natural” way to learn, from cognitive scientist Daniel Willingham. He is a professor and director of graduate studies in psychology at the University of Virginia and author of “Why ...

Jun 26

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Pleasure Response from Chocolate: You Can See it in the Eyes

The brain’s pleasure response to tasting food can be measured through the eyes using a common, low-cost ophthalmological tool, according to a study just published in the journal Obesity. If validated, this method could be useful for research and ...

Jun 25

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