Surprise finding shows oxytocin strengthens bad memories and can ...

It turns out the love hormone oxytocin is two-faced. Oxytocin has long been known as the warm, fuzzy hormone that promotes feelings of love, social bonding and well-being. It's even being tested as an anti-anxiety drug. But new Northwestern ...

Jul 23

Categories: Anxiety, Fear

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Go-carting babies reveal origin of fear of heights

STEPPING out onto the glass platform of the Willis Tower, 412 metres above the streets of Chicago is enough to make most people dizzy. Not so babies, who are born with no fear of heights. Now it seems that this wariness develops as a result of ...

Jul 22

Categories: Fear

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How would it be to have the body of a child again?

A research, recently published on the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests that a correlate of a body-ownership illusion is that the virtual type of body carries with it a set of temporary changes in perception and ...

Jul 20

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A Better Way to Discover Your Strengths

If you want to excel at anything, it’s not enough to fix your weaknesses. You also need to leverage your strengths. When Albert Einstein failed a French exam, if he had concentrated only on his language skills, he might never have transformed ...

Jul 20

Categories: Self-Confidence, Strengths Assessment

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Is Sexual Addiction a mental disorder?

Controversy exists over what some mental health experts call "hypersexuality," or sexual "addiction." Namely, is it a mental disorder at all, or something else? It failed to make the cut in the recently updated Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of ...

Jul 20

Categories: Addictions

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How Eye Contact Works

The stories of Bill Clinton's charisma are legend. Much of that charisma was communicated through eye contact. Those who have met him say that when he looks at you, it's a very intimate experience. His eye contact is said to be deep and personal, ...

Jul 19

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Marriage rate in US lowest in a century

Fewer women are getting married and they’re waiting longer to tie the knot when they do decide to walk down the aisle. That’s according to a new Family Profile from the National Center for Family and Marriage Research (NCFMR) at Bowling Green ...

Jul 19

Categories: Relationships & Marriage

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Good Vibrations: Mediating Mood Through Brain Ultrasound

University of Arizona researchers have found in a recent study that ultrasound waves applied to specific areas of the brain appear able to alter patients' moods. The discovery has led the scientists to conduct further investigations with the hope ...

Jul 19

Categories: Mood Swings / Bipolar

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Unattractive people more likely to be bullied at work, new study shows

It’s common knowledge that high school can be a cruel environment where attractive students are considered “popular,” and unattractive kids often get bullied. While that type of petty behavior is expected to vanish with adulthood, new research ...

Jul 18

Categories: Bullying

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FDA Approves Brainwave Device For Diagnosing ADHD

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a brainwave-measuring device to help diagnose kids with ADHD, a first for the disorder. The device detects two different types of brainwaves, theta and beta, and how frequently they occur. Kids ...

Jul 18

Categories: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

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Homeownership, the Key to Happiness?

If trying to buy an apartment in New York City has been making you miserable, consider this: actually getting that home may not make you happy. A growing body of research suggests that spending money on real estate doesn’t necessarily mean ...

Jul 17

Categories: Happiness

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Inner Speech Speaks Volumes About the Brain

Whether you’re reading the paper or thinking through your schedule for the day, chances are that you’re hearing yourself speak even if you’re not saying words out loud. This internal speech — the monologue you “hear” inside your head — ...

Jul 17

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Gang Membership Tied To Mental Health Problems

Young men who are members of street gangs are more likely to have psychiatric illnesses and access mental health services, according to new research from the UK published online in the July 12th issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry. Lead ...

Jul 17

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Music decreases perceived pain for kids in pediatric ER: UAlberta ...

Newly published findings by medical researchers at the University of Alberta provide more evidence that music decreases children’s perceived sense of pain. Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry researcher Lisa Hartling led the research team that ...

Jul 16

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People Are Happier When They Do The Right Thing

What has happened to people's happiness all around the world as they've faced the economic crisis? How have they coped with job losses, less money coming in, the sense of despair and lack of control over a nightmare that seems to have no ...

Jul 16

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