Curiousity primes brain for learning

The more our curiosity is piqued, the easier all learning becomes within a certain period of time, according to new research published in the journal Neuron. The findings could highlight ways to enhance overall learning and memory in both healthy ...

Oct 7

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Faith may protect against suicide

Death by suicide is one of the most common causes of death in the adolescent population, and it is potentially preventable. Religious Jewish teens are far less likely to attempt suicide than their secular Jewish peers, according to a new study ...

Oct 7

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Teens with strong attention skills more likely to avoid substance ...

New research suggests teens with strong executive attention skills – the ability to focus on task and ignore distractions – are more likely to avoid substance abuse issues after early drug experimentation.

Oct 4

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Can social media help you out of a bad mood?

Recent studies found that people who spend a lot of time on Facebook tend to be more frustrated, angry, and lonely — presumably because of all the happy updates from friends that make them feel inadequate. A new study suggests that when people are ...

Oct 4

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How to deal with a toxic co-worker

Do you feel exhausted the second you walk into your office in the morning? Do you sometimes come home from work feeling completely and utterly emotionally drained? If it’s not the work itself or the job that’s bringing you down, it could be one ...

Oct 4

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Alcohol makes men more responsive to smiles

The findings for a new research suggest that for men, alcohol increases sensitivity to rewarding social behaviors like smiling. This may shed light on risk factors that contribute to problem drinking among men.

Oct 3

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Multi-pronged intervention strategy aims to tame mean girls

Recent media coverage of this behavior – sometimes known as “mean girl” bullying – has shown that relation aggression can lead to tragic and sometimes fatal outcomes. University of Missouri researchers have developed a multi-pronged ...

Oct 3

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Exercise protects you from stress-induced depression

A new study has uncovered how exercise protects the brain from stress-related depression. Researchers at Sweden’s Karolinska Institutet have found that exercise causes important changes in skeletal muscles. These changes help to purge the blood of ...

Oct 3

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Guided Mindfulness Meditation on Overcoming Anxiety and Fear

If you are feeling a tightness in your chest, faster heartbeat, or shortened breath, you are likely feeling symptoms of anxiety and ...

Oct 2

Categories: Anxiety, Fear, Mindfulness Meditation

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Decreased ability to identify odors can predict death: Olfactory ...

For older adults, being unable to identify scents is a strong predictor of death within five years, according to a study published October 1, 2014, in the journal PLOS ONE. Thirty-nine percent of study subjects who failed a simple smelling test died ...

Oct 2

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Less Than 5 Hours of Sleep Leads to False Memories

A recent study in Psychological Science found that sleep deprivation is linked to false memories. Among the 193 people tested, those who got 5 or fewer hours of sleep for just one night were significantly more likely to say they'd seen a news video ...

Oct 2

Categories: Sleep Disorders

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The hidden cause of suicide

Perfectionism is a bigger risk factor in suicide than is often thought, according to new research. It involves being highly self-critical, constantly striving to meet the standards of others (typically parents or mentors) and being unsure about the ...

Oct 1

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How to sit with painful emotions

When we fight the pain: judge it, try to push it away, avoid it, ignore it, it actually triggers other painful emotions, resulting in more emotional pain.We also never learn healthy ways to cope. Sitting with our emotions simply means allowing them, ...

Oct 1

Categories: Depression

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Self-compassion trumps self-esteem for body image

Researchers have discovered that self-compassion can protect girls and young women from unhealthy weight-control practices and eating disorders.

Oct 1

Categories: Eating Disorders

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Why flunking exams is actually a good thing

Across a variety of experiments, psychologists have found that, in some circumstances, wrong answers on a pretest aren’t merely useless guesses. Rather, the attempts themselves change how we think about and store the information contained in the ...

Sep 30

Categories: Academic Issues

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