How the brain repairs itself after a stroke

Researchers in Sweden have found that after a stroke, support cells, known as astrocytes, start to form new nerve cells in the brain. Strokes are caused by blood vessels in the brain getting blocked by a clot — this causes nerve cells to die. The ...

Oct 13

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Kids’ eating problems could warn of mental issues

A new study warns parents that childhood eating problems could predict underlying psychological issues. Researchers at the University of Montreal found that common psychological and physical factors linked to the developmental period, are involved ...

Oct 13

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Kids Who Exercise Don't Sweat Tests

Hey kids, here's a good reason to work up a sweat: when young people exercise for an hour each day it also helps boost their brain power. That's according to a study of more than 200 kids in the journal Pediatrics.

Oct 11

Categories: Child Development

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Children can learn to control their powerful sweets cravings: study

For children, the lure of cookies and fast food is distinctly more powerful than for adolescents and adults, although children's cognitive wiring is well suited to train such cravings, according to researchers hailing principally from Columbia ...

Oct 11

Categories: Child Development, Eating Disorders

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The magic word that lowers anxiety

This magic word helps combat discouragement and turns potentially disastrous days into productive ones. It’s good for your health, your self-esteem, and can make you a more productive, better person.

Oct 10

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Binge drinking can amplify live damage

University of Missouri researchers discovered binge drinking or over-consumption of alcohol is especially dangerous among those who already drink a lot. It can lead to changes in liver proteins that may result in cirrhosis and cancer.

Oct 10

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Mental abuse can be worse than sexual or physical abuse for kids

Although childhood emotional abuse is rarely addressed by clinicians, new research suggests psychological abuse among children may lead to more problems than sexual or physical abuse.

Oct 10

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Sharing experiences can intensify emotions

New research suggests that enjoying an experience with another person results in more intense feelings about the encounter. In fact, psychological researchers discovered undergoing an experience with another person — even if we do it in silence, ...

Oct 9

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Are sweet-toothed people also sweet by nature?

Three years ago psychologists reported that we assume people who like sweet food are also sweet natured. More surprisingly perhaps, researchers found that the sweet-toothed really do have more agreeable personalities and are more inclined to behave ...

Oct 9

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Toddlers change behaviour according to emotions detected

New research discovers the capabilities of a toddler greatly exceed what many adults believe is possible. The study by researchers at the University of Washington (UW) finds that children as young as 15 months are able to detect adult emotions and ...

Oct 9

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Family meals can protect against obesity

Public health experts say that over a third of all adult Americans are obese. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, obesity now affects 17 percent of all children and adolescents in the United States – triple the rate from ...

Oct 8

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Exercise improves long-term memory

While it’s now well-established that months of aerobic exercise can enhance memory, a new study suggests that one single workout with weights can immediately enhance long-term memory by around 20%, examining the effects of a relatively short ...

Oct 8

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Extraordinary experiences could hurt your relationships

Extraordinary experiences are pleasurable in the moment but can leave us socially worse off in the long run. If you’ve just returned from an exotic getaway, gushing about it may harm your relationships, suggests a study published in the journal ...

Oct 8

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Source of both life's happiest and saddest moments

When you look back over your life, which moments have given you the most pain — and which the most pleasure? Research suggests that it’s the highs and lows of social relationships that provide the highest highs and lowest lows that people ...

Oct 7

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Curiousity primes brain for learning

The more our curiosity is piqued, the easier all learning becomes within a certain period of time, according to new research published in the journal Neuron. The findings could highlight ways to enhance overall learning and memory in both healthy ...

Oct 7

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