New tools sought to assess cognitive growth in intellectually disabled

A new initiative seeks to improve the assessment of cognitive development among people with an intellectual disability. Better methods to evaluate changes in status are critical for the development of new treatments and programs.

Nov 4

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The trouble with modern friendship

Few ideas from social science have burrowed their way into the public imagination like Dunbar's Number, the famous finding that we humans can't cope with a social circle much larger than 150 people. To accumulate 1,000 Facebook friends, Dunbar's ...

Nov 3

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People often tweak moral values in self interest

People are quick to change their moral values based on self interest and how much cash they are likely to receive, according to a new study published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Nov 3

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Conforming is uniquely human

Conforming just to fit in is a trait unique to humans and often begins in early childhood, according to new research published in the journal Psychological Science. In fact, it is nonexistent in apes.

Nov 3

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The type of daydreaming that makes the mind more efficient

Daydreaming and mind-wandering can have positive effects on mental performance in the right circumstances, a new study finds.

Nov 1

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Sadness lasts longer than other feelings

We have all been there at some point in our lives: that emotional span of time after a difficult breakup, the death of a loved one or an injury, when it seems like climbing out of the pit of despair is an insurmountable task. But why does sadness ...

Nov 1

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Parenting style probably does not raise IQ in children

The ability to improve intelligence by environmental manipulation remains a subject of considerable debate. New research explores if a parents interactions with their child can help boost the child's intelligence. Although the interactions are ...

Nov 1

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Walking workstations can improve mental

Going to work is often associated with high stress and low physical activity. For many, work is characterized by long hours of sitting, which is linked to poor health. With these concerns in mind Dr. Michael Sliter, an assistant professor of ...

Oct 31

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The importance of being alone

For many of us, alone is a negative state of being. Society doesn’t help us with this either; being alone often carries a social stigma, implying isolation, being on the outside. Although alone and lonely are often thought of as being one in the ...

Oct 31

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The number of children that makes parents happiest

First and second children provide parents a boost in happiness up to a year before they are born but the third does not, new research finds.

Oct 31

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Religiosity may reduce suicidal thoughts in African-Americans

Research suggests religiosity among African-Americans helps to keep suicidal rates low despite the psychological stress of racism.

Oct 30

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The psychology of violent extremism

Today the UK and its allies are at war with an extremist group based in Syria and Iraq that calls itself the Islamic State. Many of the fighters of the Islamic State are Western citizens. Indeed, this week there were reports that a fourth jihadist ...

Oct 30

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A fast-acting treatment which helps severely depressed experience ...

A drug being newly tested as a fast-acting antidepressant has shown it can help lift heavy depression within 40 minutes.

Oct 30

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Connecting through multiple channels benefits parent-adult child ...

"Call your mother" may be the familiar refrain, but research from the University of Kansas shows that being able to text, email and 'Facebook' dad may be just as important for young adults.

Oct 29

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Child-directed play blends autistic kids into group

Finding a setting that allows autistic kids to socialize with more normally developing peers is often a Catch-22 for parents. For while autistic youth need significant practice to develop social skills, deficits in this skill set often make play, ...

Oct 29

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