Gossip can promote self-reflection and growth

Whether they like to admit it or not, most people are interested in gossip about other people’s achievements and failures. And while gossip is often seen as negative, a new study has found that listening to gossip may help us adapt to a social ...

Oct 27

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Reminiscing can help boost mental performance

New research led by Cornell University neuroscientist Nathan Spreng shows for the first time that engaging brain areas linked to so-called "off-task" mental activities (such as mind-wandering and reminiscing) can actually boost performance on some ...

Oct 25

Categories: Aging & Geriatric Issues

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Eating Fruits, Vegetables Boosts Mental Health, Says Study

Regular consumption of fruits and vegetables can help improve mental health, an Australian study says.

Oct 25

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Grief brings infection risk for elderly

Bereavement affects a person’s immune system, and the impact varies as we grow older, say researchers.

Oct 24

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Software model predicts risk of depression relapse

German neuroscientists have written a software program that they believe can calculate the risk for experiencing a major depression relapse.

Oct 24

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Animal therapy can ease college stress

Researchers found a 60 percent decrease in self-reported anxiety and loneliness symptoms among college students following animal-assisted therapy.

Oct 24

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New research reveals why up to one in six people get SAD in Winter

Scientists have found that people who have Seasonally Affected Disorder (SAD) show important differences in the way the neurotransmitter serotonin is regulated in the brain. Serotonin is thought to play a part in how our moods change.

Oct 23

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Depressed people believe in better life ahead

A new study finds that even depressed people are optimistic about the future. However, researchers also discovered the positive outlook may not lead to better outcomes.

Oct 23

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Strong vocabulary protects against cognitive decline

New research suggests a robust vocabulary may reduce mild cognitive impairment and lead to a lower risk of developing dementia.

Oct 23

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Women more likely to develop anxiety and depression after a heart ...

Women are more likely to develop anxiety and depression after a heart attack than men, according to new research. “The World Health Organization predicts that by 2020 depression will be the second leading cause of disability and mortality in the ...

Oct 21

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Why your brain makes you reach for junk food

Will that be a pizza for you or will you go for a salad? Choosing what you eat is not simply a matter of taste, conclude scientists in a new study at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital of McGill University and the McGill University ...

Oct 21

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Social media can help connect those with severe mental illness

Researchers found people with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or bipolar disorder are comfortable using a social media website like YouTube to provide and receive naturally occurring peer support.

Oct 21

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Eating breakfast boosts dopamine and regulates overeating and cravings

A new study has found that eating breakfast, especially foods rich in protein, increases the levels of a brain chemical associated with feelings of reward, which can help reduce food cravings and overeating later in the day.

Oct 20

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How to feel happy just by walking differently

It’s well-known that when we’re in a good mood, our style of walking tends to reflect how we feel: we bounce along, shoulders back, swinging our arms in style. Sometimes, just from our gait, it’s more obvious to other people how we feel than ...

Oct 20

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Toddlers with low empathy at risk for future behavior problems

Toddlers who don’t feel guilty after bad behavior or who are less affectionate or less responsive to affection may be at risk for greater behavior problems by the time they enter first grade, according to a new study by the University of Michigan ...

Oct 20

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