Traditional Korean Girlfriend

Published on January 21, 2018

Dear Dr. Park,

I am an American male. I lived in Korea for a few years and absorbed the culture like a sponge. The feeling of the country resonated in my soul. It was like falling in love with a woman but this was with a culture. I even learned to read, write and speak Korean. Anyway, I met a girl, who is very traditional. I have pledged my love for her. My Korean god-father talked with her and her mother. Her mother said it was OK. I currently live in Japan and will be for two more years and we must develop deeper relationship with letters. The girl doesn't seem to have an opinion though. She keeps her emotions very hidden (traditional style, I know). Can you give me any kind of clue about traditional Korean female romantic mindset? I know, it's a lot of individual characteristics. But any advice about what she might be thinking, I would appreciate it. Thank you for your time.

Dear sender,

There is a saying, "Love knows no boundaries." There is another Korean saying that goes, "There is no royal road that leads to love."

No matter how traditional a Korean woman is, her approach and feelings on love won't be very different from other women.

The most important thing here is how much you actually, truly love this woman. If you can let her know your true feelings, and if you continuously and mutually accumulate these feelings, your love will easily progress.

But, since you currently live in Japan, the fact that you can't see her in person to talk to might be a disadvantage. If you don't see each other, then your love can become very passive.

You mentioned that you were currently exchanging letters, I suggest going beyond that and sending a present. Anything that you can do, do it. And if circumstances allow, come to Korea and make time to see her. For the love between you to grow deeper, you must accumulate what we Koreans commonly call "jeong," or affection for one another, an emotional attachment.

I wish you the best of luck.

Dr. Park

Category(s):Couple Counseling, Marital Counseling

Written by:

Dr.Park, Jinseng

Dr. Park studied at Pusan National University and did his Fellowship at Seoul National University Hospital.

He is a psychiatrist and specialist in marital counseling and family problems and wrote the bestseller, Lovers! Marry After You Have Fought. He also recently wrote a new book, Finding Yourself Within Love.

Moreover, he was an organizing committee member of the 16th International Congress of Psychotherapy.

He was a visiting professor at Catholic University (Meditation and Counseling) and is the current director of Director of Dr. Park's Psychiatric Clinic (Tel. 02-563-0609).

Dr. Park is a highly trained psychiatrist and brings a wealth of experience in treating various kinds of mental health issues and disorders.

Dr. Park got a certificate of appreciation from the U.S. Embassy in Seoul for his professionalism and dedication in assisting American citizens and their families for three years (2012- 2014).

Dr.Park, Jinseng belongs to Dr.Park's Psychiatric Clinic in South Korea

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